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Amstrad Action
AmstradAction -logo

Launch Editor

Peter Connor

Company

Future Publishing

ISSN

0954-8068

First Date

October 1985

Final Date

June 1995

Total Issues

117

Amstrad Action was a monthly magazine, published in the United Kingdom, which catered to owners of home computers from the Amstrad CPC range and later the GX4000 console. It was the first magazine published by Chris Anderson's Future Publishing, which, with a varied line-up of computing and non-computing related titles, has since become one of the foremost magazine publishers in the UK.

The publication, often abbreviated to AA by staff and readers, had the longest lifetime of any Amstrad magazine, running from October 1985 until June 1995 and produced 117 issues in total. The magazine was still being published long after the CPC had ceased production and games were no longer available in the shops.

HistoryEdit

Amstrad Action was the first magazine to be published by Future Publishing, a company set up by Chris Anderson (ex-Personal Computer Games and Zzap!64 editor). Launch Editor, Peter Connor, also an ex-Personal Computer Games staff member, shared the writing duties with the only other staff writer, Bob Wade. Bob, another ex-Personal Computer Games/Zzap!64, was given the title 'Software Editor' and would review the vast majority of the games featured, with Peter given a second opinion. Trevor Gilham, Art Editor, would complete the four man team.

Issue 1 dated October 1985 was released in September 1985 with the cover price of £1; 1 pence for every one of the 100 pages. It took the new publication a few issues to find its readers, but with the help of a bumper 116 page Christmas 1985 issue with a cover mounted tape, the circulation figures grew rapidly.

In October 1986 Amstrad Action split into three separate publications. AA still catered for the CPC range, while 8000 Plus and PC Plus focused on the Amstrad PCW and PC range respectively.

In 1991, AA finally gave in to reader's pleas to have a permanent cover tape. An announcement was made, in AA66, that the following issue would, not only contain a cover tape, but contain more colour and be printed on different paper. Review pages were also slightly re-designed.

Features and editorial styleEdit

AA covered both 'games' and 'serious' side of the CPC, maintaining a 50/50 coverage throughout its run. The editorial coverage was always seen as being one of the three main areas; there was the games (or leisure), serious (programming, business software etc.), and the regulars. Features would come and go, but there was long-running features including 'Amscene', 'Forum', 'Action Test', and 'Cheat Mode'.

Amscene

The latest CPC news regarding all things in the Amstrad world. Later included the games charts and games preview pages.

Reaction

The readers letters were answered in the Reaction section, where numerous arguments and, usually good natured, humour was found. Later during AAs run the standout letter of the month was highlighted and given the star prize award of £25.00. The technical problems page 'Problem Attic' started out in the Reaction pages in the early years before getting its own space. "If your CPC's in danger, if you need help, then you can contact the AA team."

Action Test

The review approach included a main write up, a second opinion box, a good news / bad news comparison list and the percentages. Percentages were given to Graphics, Sonics, Grab Factor, Staying Power and an overall AA Rating. High rated games of 80% and above were given an 'AA Rave' accolade, while the highest rated game of the month received the 'Mastergame' award. This review style continued well into the early 1990s when the award accolades were scrapped. As budget games became more prominent during the CPC's life AA covered this growing market by including budget reviews in the 'Budget Bonanza' and later 'Action Replay' sections.

The Pilgrim

Interactive fiction was covered by "The Pilgrim", then "Balrog" and "The Examiner". The Pilgrim format included the latest adventure game reviews. 'Clue Sniffing With The Pilgrim' included adventure clues and tips. 'Pilgrim Post' was the letters column for adventure game topics. 'Adventure News' detailed the latest happenings in the world of adventure games.

Forum

The Forum carried on from the Problem Attic column where the resident Technical Editor answered reader's hardware or software problems and queries. As space in the magazine became restrictive other features like 'Helpline' and 'Ask Alex' were merged into the new 'Techy Forum'.

Type-In

One long running feature of AA was the Type-In section. This included utility, games and demo type-ins sent in by the readers. This involved typing the program code into the computer then running it. This itself split the readership over whether the programs should be put on the covertape instead. Over a six month period this is what happened, until this practice (and ultimately the Type-Ins section) was abandoned due to space restrictions.

Helpline

The Helpline page was where eager Amstrad readers would offer contact details help fellow readers having problems. The page was later merged with Technical Forum.

Cheat Mode

The tips pages included game pokes, tips, cheats and maps all contributed by the readers.

Afterthought

Initially called Rear View, the back page was where all the loose ends were closed off, like competition winner results and last minute happenings.

Features

As activity in the Amstrad world declined, the editorial staff, and editorial content, was constantly being reduced and the magazine adopted an increasingly eccentric style, with one edition in particular featuring an eight-page script for a Christmas pantomime. Later on, a double spread review for the 2nd Teenage Mutant Hero Turtles game was split between the review itself and bizarre transcribed interview between Rod Lawton and Adam Peters (pretending to be one of the turtles). Peters would usually try and promote his band in some way (he featured on the cover of 'music orientated' issue and had one of his techno-MIDI band's songs on the covertape). The magazine is also notable for pioneering the kind of responses - sometimes dry, sometimes surreal, usually humorous and mildly rude - to readers' letters of a form now seen throughout UK gaming magazine culture. These characteristics, for many readers, added to AA's charm.

Cover TapesEdit

Chris Anderson using his previous success of covermounted cassette tapes with Personal Computer Games included one with the Christmas special issue of 1985. This included two unreleased games from Ocean Software; Kung Fu and Number 1. But the covermount cassette tape was only an occurrence on the Christmas and AA birthday issues, not becoming a regular feature until AA67 in 1991, mainly due to requests from many readers. Cover-cassettes featured game demos, applications, software utilities and, in some instances, complete games. Due to the low quality of the cassettes used many Amstrad owners found them to be unreliable, something which was commonly reflected in the letters pages. One solution to fixing the unreliable tapes as posted to the letters section was to unwind the tape and put a warm iron on it! Later, a utility was released on the covertape to convert the contents to the proprietary 3" disk.

Dizzy, AA Special Edition

Codemasters produced a Dizzy game specially for the AA birthday covertape in October 1988. This 'Special Edition' included different rooms and objects to explore.

Action Pack #1

AA67, dated April 1990, came with the first of the permanent cover tapes called Action Pack #1, along with a new cover price of £2.20. A playable demo of Ocean Software's Total Recall and complete games Hydrofool and Codemasters' Dizzy were included on the tape.

How To Cause A Complete Controversy

Action Pack #2 caused some controversy among the readers as one of the featured games How To Be A Complete Bastard featured mild swearing, plus the game's quest was to be violent and obnoxious throughout a house party.

Stormlord Censored

December 1993 AA99's Serious Action cover tape included the complete Stormlord game, albeit a censored version. With the self-censoring of the Hewson game it seemed that AA was trying to avoid similar controversy that followed AA68's Action Pack #2.

Best Game Ever On Covertape

Voted the best game on the CPC, Firebird's Elite was the complete game given away with the 100th issue's Serious Action cover tape.

AA Games AccoladesEdit

Initially only the best rated game of the month earned an AA Mastergame accolade, but from issue 57 this was changed to all games that received a 90% or higher rating. Games receiving 80-90% were awarded an AA Rave. Publishers of CPC games such as Activision, Ocean Software and Infogrames proudly mounted these awards on their packaging to promote their games to potential customers. The first game to receive a 'Mastergame' award was Melbourne House's The Way of the Exploding Fist, gaining an impressive 94% AA Rating. Issue 38 was the first issue not to award any game the Mastergame accolade. Apparently there were no games worthy of the award that month. The lowest rated Mastergame was Target Renegade, from Imagine Software, receiving a 86% overall rating. Quite why it was awarded a Mastergame was not explained and remains a mystery.

Laser Squad, by Blade Software, which has been mentioned many times as being an AA staff favourite, is awarded the Mastergame accolade, in AA49, with a 91% rating. March 1990 and the mysterious lost Mastergame that would be Chase HQ. The Ocean arcade game conversion received a score of 90%, coupled with being the highest rated game this issue. This would normally justify the Mastergame accolade, however the game only got an AA Rave accolade and no explanation or corrections were made since. June 1990 was the first issue to award the Mastergame accolade to more than one game; E-Motion by US Gold and Turrican by Rainbow Arts received ratings of 92% and 90% respectively. November 1990 and Rick Dangerous 2 received the highest rating so far. The MicroStyle game gained a MasterGame award and an AA Rating of 97%.

Psygnosis' Lemmings and Ocean Software's The Addams Family were the last games to receive a Mastergame accolade in July 1992's AA82; receiving 97% and 90% respectively. Following issues dispensed with AA Rave and Mastergame accolades. Lemmings joins Rick Dangerous 2 as gaining the highest AA rating given during its publication. March 1993's issue 90 featured the first highest rated game not to receive an AA accolade. Nigel Mansell's World Championship received an overall rating of 93%, but no accolade of either Rave or Mastergame. The long standing AA signature accolade had been discarded.

Street Fighter 2Edit

At the height of its popularity, Street Fighter II was released on the 16-bit computers by US Gold. However, in early press releases, the firm had stated that it would also be releasing 8-bit versions of the game on all platforms. Eventually, however, only the Commodore 64 and ZX Spectrum versions of the game were released. AAcovered the saga for many months. AA90 and Street Fighter II was mentioned in the Next Month column. Street Fighter IIeven featured on the front of AA95 and included inside was a 'story so far' write up.&nbsp Street Fighter II was promised to be completed and ready for review in AA100. News announced in AA100 that the long awaited Street Fighter II had been abandoned. According to U.S. Gold there were no plans to release a CPC version and that any previous release date given was a clerical error.

Editorial staffEdit

Memorable staff included Publisher Chris Anderson, Bob Wade, Richard Monteiro, Steve Carey, Rod Lawton, Trenton Webb, James Leach, Frank O'Connor and Adam Waring. Later editorial staff included Linda Barker, Dave Golder, Tim Norris and Simon Forrester.

EditorsEdit

Peter Connor, Oct 1985 - May 1986
Matt Nicholson, Jun 1986 - Nov 1986
Jim Nagel, Dec 1986 - Jan 1987
Bob Wade, Feb 1987 - Jul 1988
Steve Carey, Aug 1988 - Nov 1989
Rod Lawton, Dec 1989 - Feb 1993
Linda Barker, Mar 1993
Tim Norris, Apr 1993 - Aug 1993
Dave Golder, Sep 1993 - Oct 1994
Tim Norris, Nov 1994
Karen Levell, Dec 1994 - Jun 1995

Other staff membersEdit

Bob Wade (Software Editor) Oct 1985 - Jan 1987
Richard Monteiro (Technical Editor) Dec 1986 - May 1988
Gary Barrett (Staff Writer) Oct 1987 - Feb 1989
Pat McDonald (Technical Editor) Jun 1988 - Oct 1989
Trenton Webb (Games Editor) Mar 1989 - Aug 1990
Adam Waring (Reviews Editor) Nov 1989 - Aug 1992
James Leach (Staff Writer) Sep 1990 - Jan 1991
Frank O'Connor (Staff Writer) Feb 1991 - Sep 1991
Adam Peters (Staff Writer) Oct 1991 - Jan 1993
Simon Forrester (Staff Writer) Feb 1993 - Jul 1994
Clur Hodgson (Staff Writer) Jan 1994 - Apr 1994

StatsEdit

Amstrad Action Circulation

Circulation FiguresEdit

Year Jan-Jun Jul-Dec
1987 N/A 34,555
1988 35,095 38,457
1989 35,189 35,064
1990 30,156 31,228
1991 35,159 37,120
1992 35,298 27,090
1993 21,832 15,168

Games ReviewsEdit

Issue Games Reviewed Average Score Highest Score Highest scoring game Lowest Score Lowest scoring game
1 19 76% 94% Way of the Exploding Fist 24% Fu-Kung in Las Vegas
2 38 71% 95% Highway Encounter 33% Munch-It / Climb-It
3 26 74% 95% Marsport 22% Tomb of Kuslak
4 26 72% 92% Yie Ar Kung-Fu 27% Renegade (Kuma)
33 14 57% 93% Nebulus 15% Fruit Machine Simulator
34 15 64% 92% Dark Side,
Time and Magik
39% Gee Bee Air Rally
35 10 64% 86% Target; Renegade 42% The Fury
36 14 61% 90% The Bard's Tale 28% Psycho Pigs U.X.B.
37 12 68% 92% Heroes of the Lance 39% Bionic Commando
62 7 71% 97% Rick Dangerous 2 30% County Cricket
63 9 67% 86% Kick Off 2 32% Soccer Director
64 10 64% 94% Switchblade 40% Cup Football
65 10 69% 93% Lotus Esprit Turbo Challenge 40% Trevor Brooking's World Cup Glory, Badlands
66 12 76% 94% RoboCop 2 56% STUN Runner
67 11 79% 89% 10 Pack (compilation) 59% Helter Skelter

Other InfoEdit

Issue Cover Date Release Date Pages Price Editor
1 October 1985 12th September 1985 100 £1.00 Peter Connor
2 November 1985 10th October 1985 108 £1.00 Peter Connor
3 December 1985 7th November 1985 108 £1.00 Peter Connor
4 Christmas 1985 12th December 1985 116 £1.50 Peter Connor
5 February 1986 9th January 1986 100 £1.00 Peter Connor
6 March 1986 February 1986 116 £1.00 Peter Connor
7 April 1986 March 1986 124 £1.00 Peter Connor
8 May 1986 April 1986 116 £1.50 Peter Connor
9 June 1986 May 1986 116 £1.00 Matt Nicholson
10 July 1986 June 1986 108 £1.00 Matt Nicholson
11 August 1986 July 1986 100 £1.00 Matt Nicholson
12 September 1986 August 1986 92 £1.00 Matt Nicholson
13 October 1986 September 1986 84 £1.00 Matt Nicholson
14 November 1986 October 1986 100 £1.00 Matt Nicholson
15 December 1986 November 1986 116 £1.00 Jim Nagel
16 January 1987 December 1986 116 £1.50 Jim Nagel
17 February 1987 January 1987 100 £1.00 Bob Wade
18 March 1987 February 1987 84 £1.00 Bob Wade
19 April 1987 March 1987 92 £1.00 Bob Wade
20 May 1987 April 1987 90 £1.00 Bob Wade
21 June 1987 May 1987 92 £1.25 Bob Wade
22 July 1987 June 1987 92 £1.25 Bob Wade
23 August 1987 July 1987 76 £1.25 Bob Wade
24 September 1987 August 1987 68 £1.25 Bob Wade
25 October 1987 September 1987 76 £1.25 Bob Wade
26 November 1987 October 1987 84 £1.25 Bob Wade
27 December 1987 November 1987 92 £1.25 Bob Wade
28 January 1988 December 1987 100 £1.50 Bob Wade
29 February 1988 January 1988 84 £1.25 Bob Wade
30 March 1988 February 1988 84 £1.25 Bob Wade
31 April 1988 March 1988 84 £1.25 Bob Wade
32 May 1988 April 1988 84 £1.25 Bob Wade
33 June 1988 May 1988 76 £1.25 Bob Wade
34 July 1988 June 1988 76 £1.25 Bob Wade
35 August 1988 July 1988 76 £1.25 Steve Carey
36 September 1988 August 1988 76 £1.25 Steve Carey
37 October 1988 September 1988 76 £1.50 Steve Carey
38 November 1988 October 1988 84 £1.25 Steve Carey
39 December 1988 November 1988 92 £1.25 Steve Carey
40 January 1989 December 1988 92 £1.50 Steve Carey
41 February 1989 January 1989 76 £1.25 Steve Carey
42 March 1989 February 1989 76 £1.25 Steve Carey
43 April 1989 March 1989 76 £1.25 Steve Carey
44 May 1989 April 1989 76 £1.25 Steve Carey
45 June 1989 May 1989 76 £1.25 Steve Carey
46 July 1989 June 1989 84 £1.45 Steve Carey
47 August 1989 July 1989 84 £1.45 Steve Carey
48 September 1989 August 1989 84 £1.45 Steve Carey
49 October 1989 September 1989 100 £1.95 Steve Carey
50 November 1989 October 1989 92 £1.45 Steve Carey
51 December 1989 November 1989 100 £1.45 Rod Lawton
52 January 1990 December 1989 116 £1.95 Rod Lawton
53 February 1990 January 1990 92 £1.45 Rod Lawton
54 March 1990 February 1990 84 £1.45 Rod Lawton
55 April 1990 March 1990 84 £1.45 Rod Lawton
56 May 1990 April 1990 92 £1.45 Rod Lawton
57 June 1990 May 1990 92 £1.45 Rod Lawton
58 July 1990 June 1990 92 £1.45 Rod Lawton
59 August 1990 July 1990 84 £1.45 Rod Lawton
60 September 1990 August 1990 91 £1.45 Rod Lawton
61 October 1990 September 1990 100 £1.95 Rod Lawton
62 November 1990 October 1990 92 £1.60 Rod Lawton
63 December 1990 November 1990 100 £1.60 Rod Lawton
64 January 1991 December 1990 100 £1.95 Rod Lawton
65 February 1991 January 1991 92 £1.60 Rod Lawton
66 March 1991 February 1991 92 £1.60 Rod Lawton
67 April 1991 March 1991 92 £2.20 Rod Lawton
68 May 1991 April 1991 92 £2.20 Rod Lawton
69 June 1991 May 1991 76 £2.20 Rod Lawton
70 July 1991 June 1991 68 £2.20 Rod Lawton
71 August 1991 July 1991 68 £2.20 Rod Lawton
72 September 1991 August 1991 68 £2.20 Rod Lawton
73 October 1991 September 1991 74 £2.50 Rod Lawton
74 November 1991 October 1991 68 £2.50 Rod Lawton
75 December 1991 November 1991 76 £2.50 Rod Lawton
76 January 1992 December 1991 76 £2.50 Rod Lawton
77 February 1992 January 1992 68 £2.50 Rod Lawton
78 March 1992 February 1992 60 £2.50 Rod Lawton
79 April 1992 March 1992 60 £2.50 Rod Lawton
80 May 1992 April 1992 60 £2.50 Rod Lawton
81 June 1992 May 1992 60 £2.50 Rod Lawton
82 July 1992 June 1992 60 £2.50 Rod Lawton
83 August 1992 July 1992 60 £2.50 Rod Lawton
84 September 1992 August 1992 60 £2.50 Rod Lawton
85 October 1992 September 1992 60 £2.50 Rod Lawton
86 November 1992 October 1992 60 £2.50 Rod Lawton
87 December 1992 November 1992 60 £2.50 Rod Lawton
88 January 1993 December 1992 60 £2.50 Rod Lawton
89 February 1993 January 1993 60 £2.50 Rod Lawton
90 March 1993 February 1993 60 £2.50 Linda Barker
91 April 1993 March 1993 68 £2.95 Tim Norris
92 May 1993 April 1993 60 £2.95 Tim Norris
93 June 1993 May 1993 60 £2.95 Tim Norris
94 July 1993 June 1993 60 £2.95 Tim Norris
95 August 1993 July 1993 60 £2.95 Tim Norris
96 September 1993 August 1993 60 £2.95 Dave Golder
97 October 1993 September 1993 60 £2.95 Dave Golder
98 November 1993 October 1993 60 £2.95 Dave Golder
99 December 1993 November 1993 60 £2.95 Dave Golder
100 January 1994 December 1993 60 £2.95 Dave Golder
101 February 1994 January 1994 60 £2.95 Dave Golder
102 March 1994 February 1994 60 £2.95 Dave Golder
103 April 1994 March 1994 52 £2.95 Dave Golder
104 May 1994 April 1994 52 £2.95 Dave Golder
105 June 1994 May 1994 52 £2.95 Dave Golder
106 July 1994 June 1994 36 £2.95 Dave Golder
107 August 1994 July 1994 36 £2.95 Dave Golder
108 September 1994 August 1994 36 £2.95 Dave Golder
109 October 1994 September 1994 36 £2.95 Dave Golder
110 November 1994 October 1994 24 £2.95 Tim Norris
111 December 1994 November 1994 24 £2.95 Karen Levell
112 January 1995 December 1994 24 £2.95 Karen Levell
113 February 1995 January 1995 24 £2.95 Karen Levell
114 March 1995 February 1995 24 £2.95 Karen Levell
115 April 1995 March 1995 24 £2.99 Karen Levell
116 May 1995 April 1995 24 £2.99 Karen Levell
117 June 1995 May 1995 24 £3.25 Karen Levell

Issue IndexEdit

Amstrad Action Index
Date Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
1985 Amstrad Action Issue 1
1
Amstrad Action Issue 2
2
Amstrad Action Issue 3
3
1986 Amstrad Action Issue 4
4
Amstrad Action Issue 5
5
Amstrad Action Issue 6
6
Amstrad Action Issue 7
7
Amstrad Action Issue 8
8
Amstrad Action Issue 9
9
Amstrad Action Issue 10
10
Amstrad Action Issue 11
11
Amstrad Action Issue 12
12
Amstrad Action Issue 13
13
Amstrad Action Issue 14
14
Amstrad Action Issue 15
15
1987 Amstrad Action Issue 16
16
Amstrad Action Issue 17
17
Amstrad Action Issue 18
18
Amstrad Action Issue 19
19
Amstrad Action Issue 20
20
Amstrad Action Issue 21
21
Amstrad Action Issue 22
22
Amstrad Action Issue 23
23
Amstrad Action Issue 24
24
Amstrad Action Issue 25
25
Amstrad Action Issue 26
26
Amstrad Action Issue 27
27
1988 Amstrad Action Issue 28
28
Amstrad Action Issue 29
29
Amstrad Action Issue 30
30
Amstrad Action Issue 31
31
Amstrad Action Issue 32
32
Amstrad Action Issue 33
33
Amstrad Action Issue 34
34
Amstrad Action Issue 35
35
Amstrad Action Issue 36
36
Amstrad Action Issue 37
37
Amstrad Action Issue 38
38
Amstrad Action Issue 39
39
1989 Amstrad Action Issue 40
40
Amstrad Action Issue 41
41
Amstrad Action Issue 42
42
Amstrad Action Issue 43
43
Amstrad Action Issue 44
44
Amstrad Action Issue 45
45
Amstrad Action Issue 46
46
Amstrad Action Issue 47
47
Amstrad Action Issue 48
48
Amstrad Action Issue 49
49
Amstrad Action Issue 50
50
Amstrad Action Issue 51
51
1990 Amstrad Action Issue 52
52
Amstrad Action Issue 53
53
Amstrad Action Issue 54
54
Amstrad Action Issue 55
55
Amstrad Action Issue 56
56
Amstrad Action Issue 57
57
Amstrad Action Issue 58
58
Amstrad Action Issue 59
59
Amstrad Action Issue 60
60
Amstrad Action Issue 61
61
Amstrad Action Issue 62
62
Amstrad Action Issue 63
63
1991 Amstrad Action Issue 64
64
Amstrad Action Issue 65
65
Amstrad Action Issue 66
66
Amstrad Action Issue 67
67
Amstrad Action Issue 68
68
Amstrad Action Issue 69
69
Amstrad Action Issue 70
70
Amstrad Action Issue 71
71
Amstrad Action Issue 72
72
Amstrad Action Issue 73
73
Amstrad Action Issue 74
74
Amstrad Action Issue 75
75
1992 Amstrad Action Issue 76
76
Amstrad Action Issue 77
77
Amstrad Action Issue 78
78
Amstrad Action Issue 79
79
Amstrad Action Issue 80
80
Amstrad Action Issue 81
81
Amstrad Action Issue 82
82
Amstrad Action Issue 83
83
Amstrad Action Issue 84
84
Amstrad Action Issue 85
85
Amstrad Action Issue 86
86
Amstrad Action Issue 87
87
1993 Amstrad Action Issue 88
88
Amstrad Action Issue 89
89
Amstrad Action Issue 90
90
Amstrad Action Issue 91
91
Amstrad Action Issue 92
92
Amstrad Action Issue 93
93
Amstrad Action Issue 94
94
Amstrad Action Issue 95
95
Amstrad Action Issue 96
96
Amstrad Action Issue 97
97
Amstrad Action Issue 98
98
Amstrad Action Issue 99
99
1994 Amstrad Action Issue 100
100
Amstrad Action Issue 101
101
Amstrad Action Issue 102
102
Amstrad Action Issue 103
103
Amstrad Action Issue 104
104
Amstrad Action Issue 105
105
Amstrad Action Issue 106
106
Amstrad Action Issue 107
107
Amstrad Action Issue 108
108
Amstrad Action Issue 109
109
Amstrad Action Issue 110
110
Amstrad Action Issue 111
111
1995 Amstrad Action Issue 112
112
Amstrad Action Issue 113
113
Amstrad Action Issue 114
114
Amstrad Action Issue 115
115
Amstrad Action Issue 116
116
Amstrad Action Issue 117
117

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