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Your Computer Vol.1 No.1

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This issue is dated June/July 1981 and cost 50p

RegularsEdit

Contents / Editorial - 1 page (3)

Computer Club - 1½ pages (9-10)

Response Frame - Trevor Sharples & Tim Hartnell -  1 page (35)

Fingertips - David Pringle - 1 page (45)

Store Guide - 1 page (53)

Competition Corner - ½ page (55)

NewsEdit

News Headlines - 2 pages (6-7)

  • Vic set to be success: VIC-20 to be launched in UK for £160 (6)
  • Making yourself heard: Speakeasy by Wide Band Products (Voice Synthesizer) (6)
  • Business payroll program for Sinclair: Payroll program for ZX81 by Syntax Software and ZXbug for the ZX80 by Artic Computing (6)
  • Schools teletext program: 10 schools take delivery of special Mullard TV sets (6)
  • Government backs micros in education: Scheme launched to put a micro in every secondary school (7)
  • Nascom bought by Lucas: Lucas Logic take over ailing Nascom company (7)
  • Fastest Pascal compiler: Pascal compiler released by HiSoft for the Nascom, also a music board released for the Nascom by BBF (7)
  • ZX-81 peripherals are already available: Keyboard Sounder, Tape Recorder Interface and B&W Reverser by D. Bruce Ltd and Plug in User port for the ZX-80 by JMJ Interfaces (7)

FeaturesEdit

Review: The Sinclair ZX81 - 3 pages (12-14)

Sinclair unveiled the ZX-81 in March, 12 months after the launch of the £100 ZX-80. The ZX-81 at £69.95 - £49.95 in kit form — represents another step forward in technology by Sinclair and offers a number of facilities which were unavailable on the ZX-80. How good is it? In this review, Tim Hartnell takes a close and critical look at the latest Sinclair computer.

Pleasure and Business - The Atari - 2 pages (17-18)

The Atari 400 and 800 personal computers blend business with pleasure: they combine sophisticated game-playing facilities with the potential of a business computer. David Bannister looks at the tradition which produced these machines and assesses them from the hardware and software angles.

Interview: Kit Spencer - 2 pages (20-21)

Kit Spencer, who masterminded the Pet's penetration of the personal computer market in the U.K., has just taken up a new post as Commodore's European marketing director based in Switzerland, Before he left, he talked to Chris Hipwell about the personal computer phenomenon and about the Vic-20 — Commodore's bid to put a computer in every home.

Ringing the Econet Changes - 2 pages (23,25)

In its capacity as the U.K.'s Silicon Valley, the city of Cambridge has provided the setting for the development of two important network systems — the Cambridge ring and now, Acorn's Econet. Bill Bennett looks at the Econet broadcast network, its future in education and offers an example computer-aided-learning program of the type the system might use.

Languages: In search of the Standard Basic - 2 pages (26-27)

Peter Laurie sets out on a quest to find the standard form of the most widely-used programming language, Basic. On this perilous journey, he treads the marshy ground between standard and eccentricity where machines speak in strange tongues and he explains the origins of these obscurer dialects.

The Black Art of ZX~80 PEEK and POKE - Martyn Thomas - 1½ pages (29-30)

Many versions of Basic contain three powerful statements which are the keys to a completely different world of programming. The three statements are PEEK, POKE and USR, and the world they reveal is one in which ROM has no secrets, and the full power of your microcomputer can be yours for the first time.

BBC's Proton Project and the Nuclear Family - Martin Hayman - 3½ pages (36-39)

Controversy is still surging back and forth over the BBC's decision to put Acorn into the front-line by choosing an adaptation of its forthcoming Proton model as the "standard" micro for the 1982 series, Hands-on micros. Yet, as Your Computer has found, the programme makers are not daunted by the doubters and backbiters from the ranks of the microcomputer professionals and are pushing ahead with their initiative to popularise computing by putting it into every home.

Essential Kit~Building Techniques - John Dawson - 4 pages (40-41,43-44)

The time spent building a kit is never wasted. Apart from the real financial savings — which can be enough on the first kit to pay for tools lasting many years — there is a certain satisfaction when the machine works which is denied to people who merely attach a mains plug to one end of a piece of wire.

Type-InsEdit

Software File - 4 pages (47-50)

  • ZX-80
    • Crossword Challenge - Colin Hogben (47)
    • Reaction Timer - Andy Hope (47)
    • Bar-Graph Plotter - Peter Collingridge (47-48)
    • White-Dot Destroyer - R J Price (48)
    • Polynomial Solver - Paul Duckett (48)
  • Atom
    • Graphics Search - Allison Brown (49)
    • Auto-Run Tape Loader - Ian Pine (49)
    • Cartoids Drawing - Martyn Smith (49-50)
    • Atomic Space Battle - Christopher Histed (50)
    • Atom Information - Derek Haslam (50)
  • UK101
    • Escapist Solution - J Gordon (50)

AdvertsEdit

Games

  • Microtanic Software - Games 1, Games 2, Games 3 - Page 28
  • Quicksilva - QS Defender - Page 28
  • The Essential Software Company - Super Invasion & Double Breakout - Page 39
  • Program Power - Lunar Lander Supreme, Startrek II, Invasion Earth, Alien Labyrinth, Cowboy Shoot-Out, Invader Force, Star Trek, Demon Dungeon, 3D Noughts & Crosses, Breakaway, Reaction Race - Page 52
  • Bug-Byte - Fruit Machine, Atom Breakout, Atom Invaders, Pinball, UFO Bomber - Page 54
  • Control Technology - Tape Book 20, Tape Book 30, Tape Book 50 - Page 56
  • Timedata Ltd - Brkout / Ack-Ack, Shell Game / Invaders - Page 58
  • Syntax Software - ZX80 Invaders, ZX81 Invaders, Galaxy Wars, 4k Wundapack One & 4k Wundapack Two - Page 60
  • A. Knight - UK101 Games - Page 60
  • Molimerx - Space Eye - Page 61

Magazines

Other

  • Online Conferences Ltd - Page 2
  • Compshop Ltd - Page 4
  • Maplin Electronic Supplies Ltd - Page 5
  • Computer Publications; Brighton Computer Centre; Linsac; Cavern Electronics - Page 8
  • JRS Software; LFH Associates Ltd - Page 10
  • Chromasonic Electronics - Page 11
  • Premier Publications - Page 15
  • Silica Shop Limited - Page 16
  • Mine of Information Ltd - Page 19
  • MicroStyle - Page 22
  • Wideband Products; Crofton Electronics Limited - Page 24
  • Agar Computer Services - Page 28
  • Computers For All; Hassoft - Page 30
  • Interface Components Limited - Page 31
  • Sinclair Research - Pages 32-33
  • Acorn Computer Ltd - Page 34
  • Tandata Marketing Ltd - Page 42
  • Q-Tek Systems Ltd; Gran Computer Components; Tempus - Page 46
  • IO Systems Ltd; Microage Electronics - Page 51
  • Computer User Aids; Diskwise Ltd; Richard Francis - Page 52
  • Cambridge Learning Ltd; Video Software - Page 54
  • L.P. Enterprises - Page 55
  • D. Bruce Electronics; Kelly's Computer Market - Page 56
  • Lowe Electronics - Page 57
  • M D R (Interfaces) Ltd; Currah Computor Components Ltd (sic) - Page 58
  • Photo Acoustics Ltd - Page 60
  • Cambridge Computer Store; MicroStyle - Page 62
  • Micro Peripherals - Page 63
  • ComServe - Page 64

AnalysisEdit

Type Pages %
Features 22.5 35%
News 2 3%
Competitions 0.5 1%
Other Editorial (Contents, Surveys, etc..) 3 5%
Letters 1 2%
Type-Ins 4 6%
Total Editorial 33 52%
Total Adverts 31 48%

Other CreditsEdit

Staff Writer

Bill Bennett

Production Editor

Toby Wolpe

Editorial Secretary

Tracy Ebbetts

Contributors

Tim Hartnell, David Bannister, Martyn Thomas, Trevor Sharples, Martin Hayman, John Dawson, David Pringle, Peter Laurie

Publishing Director

Chris Hipwell

Issue IndexEdit

Your Computer Index
Date Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
1981 Your Computer Issue 1
1
Your Computer Issue 2
2
Your Computer Issue 3
3
Your Computer Issue 4
4
Your Computer Issue 5
5
1982 Your Computer Issue 6
6
Your Computer Issue 7
7
Your Computer Issue 8
8
Your Computer Issue 9
9
Your Computer Issue 10
10
Your Computer Issue 11
11
Your Computer Issue 12
12
Your Computer Issue 13
13
Your Computer Issue 14
14
Your Computer Issue 15
15
Your Computer Issue 16
16
Your Computer Issue 17
17
1983 Your Computer Issue 18
18
Your Computer Issue 19
19
Your Computer Issue 20
20
Your Computer Issue 21
21
Your Computer Issue 22
22
Your Computer Issue 23
23
Your Computer Issue 24
24
Your Computer Issue 25
25
Cover missing
26
Your Computer Issue 27
27
Cover missing
28
Your Computer Issue 29
29
1984 Your Computer Issue 30
30
Your Computer Issue 31
31
Your Computer Issue 32
32
Your Computer Issue 33
33
Your Computer Issue 34
34
Your Computer Issue 35
35
Your Computer Issue 36
36
  Cover missing
37
Your Computer Issue 38
38
Your Computer Issue 39
39
Your Computer Issue 40
40
1985 Your Computer Issue 41
41
Your Computer Issue 42
42
Your Computer Issue 43
43
Your Computer Issue 44
44
Your Computer Issue 45
45
Your Computer Issue 46
46
Your Computer Issue 47
47
Your Computer Issue 48
48
Your Computer Issue 49
49
Your Computer Issue 50
50
Your Computer Issue 51
51
Your Computer Issue 52
52
1986 Your Computer Issue 53
53
Your Computer Issue 54
54
Your Computer Issue 55
55
Your Computer Issue 56
56
Your Computer Issue 57
57
Your Computer Issue 58
58
Your Computer Issue 59
59
Your Computer Issue 60
60
Cover missing
61
Your Computer Issue 62
62
Your Computer Issue 63
63
Cover missing
64
1987 Your Computer Issue 65
65
Your Computer Issue 66
66
Your Computer Issue 67
67
Your Computer Issue 68
68
Your Computer Issue 69
69
Cover missing
70
Your Computer Issue 71
71
Your Computer Issue 72
72
Cover missing
73
Cover missing
74
Your Computer Issue 75
75
Your Computer Issue 76
76
1988 Your Computer Issue 77
77
Your Computer Issue 78
78
Your Computer Issue 79
79
Cover missing
80
Your Computer Issue 81
81
Cover missing
83
Cover missing
84

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