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This issue is dated March 1982 and cost 60p.

NewsEdit

News Headlines - 2 pages (12-13)

  • Education on the ZX-81 (12)
  • Super Vic and CBM 64 (12)
  • Top of the class in software (12)
  • All the fun of the fair (120
  • Experts confounded as machine out-thinks grandmaster Nunn (12)
  • Michael Orwin Software to release their second compilation - Cassette Two. (13)
  • 2k EPROM for Sinclair (13)
  • BBC Micro price rises (13)
  • Cost of Atom ROM cut (13)
  • Graphics package that draws on your skill to create on screen (13)

FeaturesEdit

Survey: ZX81 Ram Packs - Stephen Adams - 3 pages (16-18)

Stephen Adams tests and compares a clutch of seven of the main RAM packs on the market for reliability, expandability and value for money per kilobyte.

Review: The Nascom Range - Malcolm Bell - 3 pages (20-21,23)

The Nascom family includes not only the well-known models 1 and 2 but also a host of peripherals and software. Malcolm Bell evaluates the range.

Interview: Paul Kriwaczek - Brendon Gore - 2 pages (24-25)

Producer Paul Kriwaczek is the man in charge of bringing microcomputing to our TV screens. Brendon Gore visited him at the BBC studios, and together they delved behind the scenes of The Computer Programme to examine the original series concepts and how those ideas were put into effect.

Review: Chess Computers - John White - 3 pages (26-28)

Whether you want inventiveness, strong positional play or sheer tactical virtuosity from your chess machine, John White will help you choose.
Also includes reviews of PETChess, Gambiet 80 & ZXChess II

Software: ZX-81 Music - John Sylvester - 2 pages (34-35)

The ZX-81 may not be renowned for its dulcet tones, but passable music is well within its capabilities without hardware modifications. John Sylvester shows how.

Polar Plotting - Bev Mason - 2 pages (41-42)

Polar plotting can be instructive and entertaining. Curiously, it receives little attention in education. Bev Mason sets out to correct this anomaly with his Basic program.

VIC-20's Peripheral Interface Port - Nick Hampshire - 3 pages (44-46)

The RS-232 port on the Vic is the machine's main communications route to the outside world. Through this serial I/O port, the Vic can interface with peripherals such as printers and Modems. Nick Hampshire unravels the technicalities.

From Games Strategy into Action - Boris Allan - 2 pages (52-53)

With this complete noughts and crosses program, Boris Allan puts into practice the logical and strategic processes discussed last month.

Project: First Choice Forth for Control - John Dawson - 2 pages (56-57)

John Dawson turns his attention to Microtanic's implementation of Forth and finds that it has all the qualities required for writing process-control software.

Regular Features

Editorial / Contents - 1 page (3)

Your Letters - 1 page (11)

Computer Club - EZUG - Brendon Gore - 1 page (15)

Educational Users' Group pioneer Eric Deeson tells Brendon Gore of the difficulties in persuading teachers to get down to writing programs for their micros.

Response Frame - Tim Hartnell - 1 page (59)

Fingertips - David Pringle - 2 pages (61-62)

Competition Corner - 1 page (75)

Type-InsEdit

Maze Attack for the PET by Marcus Altman - 2 pages (30-31)

Snakes and Ladders for the ZX81 by Brian Horsfield - 2 pages (37-38)

Software File - 8 pages (65-67,69-73)

AdvertsEdit

Games

Magazines

  • Micro-Computer Read-Out - page 85

Other CreditsEdit

Assistant Editor

Brendon Gore

Staff Writer

Bill Bennett

Production Editor

Toby Wolpe

Production Assistant

John Liebmann

Editorial Secretary

Lynn Cowling

Contributors

Malcolm Bell, John White, John Sylvester, Bev Mason, Nick Hampshire, Boris Allan, John Dawson, David Pringle, Stephen Adams, Tim Hartnell

Publishing Director

Chris Hipwell

External linksEdit

If you want to have a browse of this magazine, head on over to World of Spectrum as it's in their magazine archive.

Issue IndexEdit

Your Computer Index
Date Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
1981 Your Computer Issue 1
1
Your Computer Issue 2
2
Your Computer Issue 3
3
Your Computer Issue 4
4
Your Computer Issue 5
5
1982 Your Computer Issue 6
6
Your Computer Issue 7
7
Your Computer Issue 8
8
Your Computer Issue 9
9
Your Computer Issue 10
10
Your Computer Issue 11
11
Your Computer Issue 12
12
Your Computer Issue 13
13
Your Computer Issue 14
14
Your Computer Issue 15
15
Your Computer Issue 16
16
Your Computer Issue 17
17
1983 Your Computer Issue 18
18
Your Computer Issue 19
19
Your Computer Issue 20
20
Your Computer Issue 21
21
Your Computer Issue 22
22
Your Computer Issue 23
23
Your Computer Issue 24
24
Your Computer Issue 25
25
Cover missing
26
Your Computer Issue 27
27
Cover missing
28
Your Computer Issue 29
29
1984 Your Computer Issue 30
30
Your Computer Issue 31
31
Your Computer Issue 32
32
Your Computer Issue 33
33
Your Computer Issue 34
34
Your Computer Issue 35
35
Your Computer Issue 36
36
  Cover missing
37
Your Computer Issue 38
38
Your Computer Issue 39
39
Your Computer Issue 40
40
1985 Your Computer Issue 41
41
Your Computer Issue 42
42
Your Computer Issue 43
43
Your Computer Issue 44
44
Your Computer Issue 45
45
Your Computer Issue 46
46
Your Computer Issue 47
47
Your Computer Issue 48
48
Your Computer Issue 49
49
Your Computer Issue 50
50
Your Computer Issue 51
51
Your Computer Issue 52
52
1986 Your Computer Issue 53
53
Your Computer Issue 54
54
Your Computer Issue 55
55
Your Computer Issue 56
56
Your Computer Issue 57
57
Your Computer Issue 58
58
Your Computer Issue 59
59
Your Computer Issue 60
60
Cover missing
61
Your Computer Issue 62
62
Your Computer Issue 63
63
Cover missing
64
1987 Your Computer Issue 65
65
Your Computer Issue 66
66
Your Computer Issue 67
67
Your Computer Issue 68
68
Your Computer Issue 69
69
Cover missing
70
Your Computer Issue 71
71
Your Computer Issue 72
72
Cover missing
73
Cover missing
74
Your Computer Issue 75
75
Your Computer Issue 76
76
1988 Your Computer Issue 77
77
Your Computer Issue 78
78
Your Computer Issue 79
79
Cover missing
80
Your Computer Issue 81
81
Cover missing
83
Cover missing
84

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